What should I do if someone shares an intimate photo of me without my permission?

We want to help you find support and take action if you need to. We worked with the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative on this list of things you can do and organizations you can reach out to for support and advice.

Document the post:

You may need a record of the post if you decide to take further action. We recommend that you take a screenshot of the post for reporting purposes.

Report the post:

You can anonymously report photos that go against Instagram's Community Guidelines. If someone is threatening to share things you want to keep private (example: messages, photos, videos), asking you to send money or asking to you to do something else you're uncomfortable with, please report their profile to us. If you don't have an Instagram account, you can report things using this form.

After reporting a post, specially trained representatives from our Community Operations team will then review the image and remove it if it goes against our Community Guidelines. We then use photo-matching technology to help stop future attempts to share the image on Instagram, Facebook and Messenger.

Unfollow or block the person who posted it:

Keep in mind that these options may keep you from seeing the post, but the person who posted it and other people on Instagram may still be able to see the post unless it’s removed.

Get support:

These organizations provide support for people who are being harassed or harmed online:

You may want local law enforcement to see if it's illegal to post things like this in your state or country. If you want to pursue legal action, you may need a screenshot or other record of the post.

You may also want to:

  • Talk with a victim advocate or social worker in your town or city. In the US, there are victim advocates in county offices, police stations, domestic violence prevention centers, rape crisis centers, sheriff’s offices and offices of state attorneys general. Victim advocates can help you gather evidence, figure out how to keep you safe and get a civil protection or anti-stalking order against the person harassing you.
  • If you’re a minor, consider talking to a school counselor or administrator you trust.
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